TAG: Burn, Rewrite, Reread

Hello, bookfriends!

It has been forever since I’ve been active here on the blog. Life has been pretty busy. I’m not making any promises that I’ll be back in full force at any time before the end of the school year (come on, June!), but I wanted to post a non-review for you.

I haven’t done a tag since January, so a tag is my obvious choice!

I was tagged in the “Burn, Rewrite, Reread” Tag by Nick @ The Paper Dragon and Michelle @ A Halfblood Fangirl. Thanks, guys!

The name of the game is Burn, Rewrite, Reread and it plays very similarly to Kiss, Marry, Kill (or other versions of the game that use an expletive instead of “kiss”).

THE RULES!:

  1. Randomly choose 3 books. (Use the ‘random’ option on your Goodreads read shelf. Thanks for that tip, it makes this so much easier)
  2. For each group, decide which book to burn, which one to rewrite, and which to reread. (A lot like Kiss, Marry, Kill.)
  3. Repeat until you completed three rounds

Round 1:

16096824  heir  cinder

This round is EASY-PEASY.

Burn:  A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas. Even though I rated this higher than Heir of Fire, I thought ACOTAR was wildly inappropriate for the intended audience. I could rewrite this, but I would want to burn it first and then start completely anew.

RewriteHeir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas. I enjoyed the first two books in the series but I didn’t like this one. I wouldn’t have to completely start over to rewrite and make this one better. I’d take out some of the slower parts, add some details to the Manon sections so that I would be less confused, and tweak some other elements here and there. (Seriously, though. Every time I got back to a Manon section, I would confuse characters’ names with their witch clans. Which witch is which?)

RereadCinder by Marissa Meyer. I highly enjoyed Cinder the first time, so I’d definitely reread it.

Round 2:

112263  thegoldencompass  wgwg

Another easy one.

BurnWill Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan. I gave this two stars. Even though I read it pretty much in one sitting, I did not enjoy it. I could easily throw it away forever.

Rewrite11/22/63 by Stephen King. The ending. I’d rewrite the ending. SIDE NOTE: If you’ve seen the Hulu show and want to read the book, you need to know that the book is extremely different from the show.

RereadThe Golden Compass by Philip Pullman. This is one of my favorite books from my childhood and I’d definitely read it again.

Round 3:

whatwesaw  rpo  say what you will

This one’s a little harder, I guess.

BurnSay What You Will by Cammie McGovern. I rated this a 4/5 stars, but it’s my least favorite of the three. I guess it has to go.

RewriteWhat We Saw by Aaron Hartzler. I just finished this book and I loved it. However, there were a few scenes in this novel that I would absolutely rewrite. The main relationship had its insta-love moments and there was this creepy seen where she meets up with another character that was out of line. I’d find another way for the two to run into each other.

RereadReady Player One by Ernest Cline. As you know, I loved this book! In fact, I might reread it as soon as I’m done posting. I’ve been wanting to reread this book ever since I finished it the first time. I loved it this much:

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There you have it, folks. I hope you have an excellent day/night/weekend/week/month/whatever until you see me next. See ya later!

kacie

 

 

Book Review: The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner

the serpent kingTitle: The Serpent King
Author: Jeff Zentner
Genre: Young Adult, Fiction, Contemporary

I received this book from Owlcrate, a YA themed book subscription box. For more information, please visit their website.

The Serpent King follows the lives of three teenagers in a small, rural high school in Tennessee over the course of their senior year. Dill, Travis, and Lydia are close friends with differing ideas of what is in store for their futures, partly due to their very different home lives.

Dill is the son of the preacher who is known for having his congregation handle poisonous snakes to test their faith. Unfortunately for Dill, his father is even more well-known for what landed him in prison, causing Dill to be trapped at home with his mother and his father’s debts.

Famous on the internet for her fashion sense, Lydia has a ticket out of this town. She has a family that loves her and connections that will take her far in life and away from the town and people that don’t fit in her blog’s aesthetic.

Travis doesn’t care what anyone thinks. While Lydia prepares for college and Dill avoids thinking about her leaving, Travis prepares himself for the next book in his favorite fantasy series, “Bloodfall” by dressing like the book’s characters and rereading the series.

As the three friends cope with the ending of high school and the beginning of what lies ahead, they learn much more about themselves and each other in the process.

 Premise: 4/5

While at first I thought the snakes were a little weird, I quickly became interested in the backstory of Dill and his family. It’s weird enough to make it different than other things that I have read. I was also a little leery at first about the novel following a group of outcast friends, simply because it’s not that original. However, I liked the way that the three diverse friends came together.

Plot Development: 5/5

The Serpent King is quickly paced from start to finish, but not overly so. The plots jumps between the three main characters and what is currently happening in their private lives as well as what’s going on with the entire group. The plot was developed evenly with next to no filler material. I was unable to put the book down.

Characterization: 5/5

Each of the main characters keep parts of their lives private from their friends. They each have their own struggles on top of the struggles of the group as a whole. The way they cope with these struggles changed over time as they matured. The characters were developed appropriately throughout the course of the novel.

Writing Style: 5/5

I highly enjoyed the writing style of this novel. It was one of the reasons I read it in one sitting. Time passed quickly while I was reading. Each of the characters had their own distinct voices reflected in the writing style.

Readability: 5/5

Like I said before, I read this book entirely in one sitting. It read extremely easily, even though some of the content wasn’t exactly easy to read about (don’t worry, I won’t spoil you!).

Total Score: 24/25, avg. 4.8/5

5 stars

The Serpent King is one of my favorite reads of 2016 and may even have topped the list. This book made me love my Owlcrate subscription even more because I hadn’t heard of this book before receiving it. I am sure glad I read it. It’s an obvious five stars from me!

I also read this book for the #sixsquaredchallenge hosted by bookstacksamber! – New Releases (Debut Authors)

Have you read The Serpent King? What did you think?

kacie

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Want to purchase a copy of The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner for yourself? Check it out on The Book Depository by clicking HERE.